I created the burkini to give women freedom, not to take it away | Aheda Zanetti

The burkini does not symbolise Islam, it symbolises leisure and joy and physical fitness and health. Who is much better, the Taliban or French political leaders?

W hen I created the burkini in early 2004, it was to offer ladies flexibility, not to take it away. My niece wished to play netball however it was a little a battle to obtain her in the group she was using a hijab. My sibling needed to defend her child to play, needed to ask and discuss the problem, why is this woman avoided from playing netball since of her modesty?

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When she was lastly enabled to play all of us went to see her to support her and exactly what she was using was completely improper for a sports uniform a skivvy, tracksuit trousers, and her hijab, completely inappropriate for any kind of sport. She appeared like a tomato she was hot and so red!

So I went house and went trying to find something that may be much better for her to use, sportswear for Muslim women, and I couldnt discover anything, I understood there was absolutely nothing in Australia. It got me believing due to the fact that when I was a woman I lost out on sport we didnt take part in anything due to the fact that we opted to be modest, however for my niece I wished to discover something that would adjust to the Australian way of life and western clothes however at the exact same time satisfy the requirements of a Muslim lady.

So I muffled my lounge space flooring and created something. I took a look at the veil and eliminated a great deal of the excess material, that made me anxious – would my Islamic neighborhood accept this? The veil is expected to cover your hair and your shape, you simply do not form anything around your body. This was formed around the neck. I believed, its just the shape of a neck, it does not actually matter.

Before I introduced it I produced a sample with a survey to learn exactly what individuals would believe – would you use this? Would this motivate you to be more active? Play more sport? Swim? A great deal of individuals in my neighborhood didnt understand ways to accept this, however I established it commercially and made a great organisation.

The burkini pertained to everybodies attention when Surf Lifesaving Australia presented a program to incorporate Muslim young boys and women into browse lifesaving after the Cronulla riots they had a young Muslim woman who wished to contend in an occasion. She used a burkini.

After September 11, the Cronulla riots, the prohibiting of the veil in France, and the global reaction that included it about us being the bad individuals all since of a couple of crooks who do not speak on behalf of Muslims I actually didnt desire anybody to evaluate ladies using these. Its just a lady being modest.

It had to do with combination and approval and being equivalent and about not being evaluated. It was tough for us at the time, the Muslim neighborhood, they had a worry of marching. They had worry of going to public swimming pools and beaches etc, and I desired ladies to have the self-confidence to continue a great life. Sport is so crucial, and we are Australian! I wished to do something favorable and anybody can use this, Christian, Jewish, Hindus. Its simply a garment to match a modest individual, or somebody who has skin cancer, or a brand-new mom who does not wish to use a swimsuit, its not symbolising Islam .

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Bus seats mistaken for burqas by members of anti-immigrant group

Comments published on Norwegian Fatherland very first Facebook group call empty seats on Oslo bus scary

A Norwegian anti-immigrant group has actually been roundly mocked after members obviously misinterpreted a photo of 6 empty bus seats published on its Facebook page for a group of ladies using burqas.

Tragic, horrible and scary were amongst the remarks published by members of the closed Fedrelandet viktigst, or Fatherland initially, group underneath the picture, inning accordance with screenshots on the Norwegian news site Nettavisen .

Other members of the 13,000-strong group, for individuals who enjoy Norway and value exactly what our forefathers defended, questioned whether the non-existent guests may be bring bombs or weapons below their clothing. This looks truly frightening, composed one. Must be prohibited. You cant inform whos beneath. Might be terrorists.

Further remarks check out: Ghastly. This ought to never ever occur, Islam is and constantly will be a curse, Get them from our nation frightening times we are residing in, and: I believed it would resemble this in the year 2050, however it is occurring NOW, inning accordance with thelocal.no and other media.

The photo, discovered on the web, was published for a joke recently by Johan Slttavik, who has because explained himself as Norways worst web giant and happy with it, below a concern asking the group: What do individuals think about this?

Slttavik informed Nettavisen and Norways TV2 he wished to highlight the distinction in between genuine criticism of migration and blind bigotry, and was interested to see how individuals understandings of an image are affected by how others around them respond. I wound up having a great laugh.

It went viral in Norway after Sindre Beyer, a previous Labour celebration MP who stated he has actually been following Fatherland initially for a long time, released 23 pages of screenshots of the groups outraged remarks.

What takes place when a picture of some empty bus seats is published to a revolting Facebook group, and almost everybody believes they see a lot of burqas? he asked in a post shared more than 1,800 times.

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The remarks recommended the large bulk of the anti-immigrant groups members saw the image as proof of the continuous Islamification of Norway, although a little number explained it remained in truth an image of bus seats. One alerted the group was making itself look ludicrous.

Beyer informed Nettavisen: Im stunned at just how much hate and phony news is spread out [on the Fedrelandet viktigst page] Much hatred versus empty bus seats definitely reveals that bias wins out over knowledge.

The head of Norways Antiracist Centre, Rune Berglund Steen, informed the website that individuals clearly see exactly what they wish to see and exactly what these individuals wish to see threaten Muslims.

Norway just recently ended up being the current European nation to propose constraints on the using of niqabs and burqas, tabling a law that will disallow them from schools, universities and kindergartens. France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Bulgaria and the German state of Bavaria all limit full-face veils in some public locations.

The nations minority federal government, a union of the centre-right Conservatives and the populist Progress celebration that deals with elections next month, stated in June it was positive it would discover opposition assistance for the relocation.

Per Sandberg, then acting migration and combination minister, informed an interview that face-covering garments such as the niqab or burqa do not belong in Norwegian schools. The capability to interact is a standard worth.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/02/bus-seats-mistaken-burqas-anti-immigrant-group-norwegian

The Gambia bans female genital mutilation

President Yahya Jammeh hooligans practice that impacts three-quarters of females in west African nation

The Gambia has actually revealed it will prohibit female genital mutilation (FGM) after the Guardian released a worldwide project to end the practice.

The president, Yahya Jammeh, stated last night that the questionable surgical intervention would be banned. He stated the restriction would enter result instantly, though it was unclear when the federal government would prepare legislation to impose it.

FGM includes cutting female genitalia typically when women are young to eliminate their labia and clitoris, which typically results in long-lasting health problems, consisting of bleeding, infections, vaginal discomfort and infertility. More than 130 million ladies worldwide undergo the treatment in Africa and the Middle East.

The practice is prevalent in lots of African nations, consisting of the Gambia, where 76% of women have actually gone through it. The age at which FGM happens in the Gambia is not tape-recorded, however it is reported that the pattern of practicing FGM on infant ladies is increasing . By the age of 14, 56% of female kids in the nation have actually had the treatment.

Kibaaro News , I have actually never ever become aware of anybody who passed away as an outcome of female genital mutilation (FGM)… If you understand exactly what FGM indicates, you understand that we do not practice that here. We do not mutilate our kids.

reports have actually revealed that public assistance for the practice has actually dropped in current years amongst females throughout any age groups.

Support for the extension of the practice is greatest amongst the nations wealthiest ladies and differs considerably in various ethnic neighborhoods, with 84% of Mandinka ladies supporting the extension of FGM compared to 12% of Wolof females.

This year FGM was prohibited in Nigeria, which signed up with 18 other African nations that have actually forbidden the practice, consisting of Central African Republic, Egypt and South Africa.

Somalia, which has the greatest occurrence of FGM worldwide, has actually suggested it wants to end the practice, with a spokesperson for the ministry for womens affairs stating it was dedicated to make this take place in spite of substantial resistance in the nation. Presently, 98% of ladies aged in between 4 and 11 go through FGM in Somalia.

The Guardian released a significant project to end FGM all over the world in 2014, with the assistance of the project petition site, Change.org.

The Guardian Global Media project works carefully with regional activists in the Gambia, Kenya and Nigeria to assist them offer education and awareness on the problem and intend to broaden the project to Sierra Leone, Senegal and Uganda next year.

Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/nov/24/the-gambia-bans-female-genital-mutilation

Tanzania’s ghost safari: how western aid contributed to the decline of a wildlife haven

International projects helped turn a rich and fertile Tanzanian valley into vast tracts of farmland, teak forests and sugar plantations

The long road from Dar es Salaam brings you through sparsely wooded hills and fields to the narrow northern neck of the Kilombero valley. Theres a bend in the road, then the land opens out, suddenly, in front of you.

Along the west side lie the steep-faced Udzungwa mountains, one of the last pristine rainforests in Tanzania. The Kilombero river runs through the red soils of the valley, flooding in November or December and subsiding by June. Down the longer eastern flank rise the Mahenge mountains, and beyond them, invisible, unfurls the vast territory of the Selous game reserve, one of the largest remaining chunks of African wilderness.

Ryan Shallom was 16 the first time he saw the Kilombero valley, in 1990. There were 600 lions in the valley back then, recalls Shallom, whose family were professional hunters, running trips for tourists and rich Tanzanians. The light tree cover in the valleys higher ground, the rivers, the abundance of food and water, meant that this was a haven not just for elephants, lions, and buffalos, but for all wildlife: a pocket Eden.

Kilombero valley map

We used to see herds of 100 elephants or more, buffalo in all directions There was the worlds largest population of puku antelope, about 60,000. I think 75% of the worlds population of puku were in Kilombero.

But from the mid 90s, the wildlife began to disappear. In 1998, elephant numbers in the valley were over 5,000, according to data collected by the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute. Now elephants are rarely seen. The lions have gone too, although there are rumours that there is one male lion left. The puku are vanishing: Shallom estimates their numbers have fallen to just over a thousand. The crocodiles, hippos, and zebra, have all more or less vanished.

We call it the ghost safari now, says scientist turned safari-man Roy Hinde. Its devastating.

Ryan
Ryan Shallom remembers a time when there were 600 lions in the Kilombero valley. Photograph: Sophie Tremblay/the Guardian

A history of aid in Kilombero valley

For many years Kilombero valley defied change. Tribes such as the Pogoro, the Ndamba-Mbunga, the Hehe and the Ngindo had lived there for centuries or frequently travelled through. From 1800 onwards the Europeans first Germans, then after the first world war, British started to arrive, eyeing up the fertile soil and making enormous plans. But somehow their plans kept falling through.

A few years after Julius Nyerere became president of an independent Tanganyika in 1961, a British survey hypothesised complete control of the flooding in the valley to free a vast area for irrigation. But it would never happen. Nyerere did not like western foreign investors, although help from communist China was acceptable. The majority of farmers in the valley then were small-scale tribal farmers about 64,000 or thereabouts. The foreigners, meanwhile, came and went. Over and over again foreign dreams a sugar plantation, a rice farm, a railway withered and died in the valley.

But in 1985 Nyerere stepped down. The new government set about the task of opening up to foreign investors once again. Kilomberos magic trick was about to come to an end.

In the 90s, the decade that Shallom and Hinde both arrived in the valley for the first time, the rice plantation and the sugar plantation were already in place, but they were sluggish, half-abandoned, state-propped up enterprises. Parts of the plantations were being used by farmers from the valley, while others were being reclaimed slowly by the forest. Farmers speckled the rest of the valley but mostly it was a little oasis, far away from the 20th century.

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A photo taken by Shallom in the mid-90s, when elephants regularly walked through his land. Photograph: Ryan Shallom/Sophie Tremblay/the Guardian

The encroachment started in the mid 90s when the cattle started moving in, says Shallom. Tanzania, like other African countries, was experiencing a rapid growth in livestock a profitable, moveable way to store capital at a time when demand for meat, both on the continent and in the rest of the world, was beginning to explode. Pastoralist tribes in Tanzania particularly the Sukuma began to move into the valley in ever larger numbers, bringing large herds of their distinctive long-horned cattle.

A teak plantation followed, funded by British aid money in the form of the Commonwealth Development Company (now known as CDC). Over the next few years it would take over 28,000 hectares (69,189 acres), and become the largest teak farm in Africa.

In 1998, the Tanzanian government sold the sugar plantation to Illovo, Africas biggest sugar company, now owned by the mega-corp Associated British Foods which continued an outgrower programme that was being tried out. There were already farmers moving into the area, but the outgrower system would turbo-charge the in-migration. The main plantation supported small-scale farmers by buying their crops at a set pre-agreed price: in some cases out-growers got training and support, and had a ready market for their crops. The model caught on fast and by 2002 there were about 3,300 outgrowers; by 2006 that number had swollen to nearly 6,000.

Finally buyers were found for the rice plantation; another international consortium involving Agrica, another British-based company. This too began an outgrower programme which was as popular as the one up the valley. Within a few years the plantation was dealing with 480 or more outgrowers.

The Tanzanian government was supportive of the growth and appeared to be supportive of the investors (although there would be clashes too). In 2009 the government announced their Kilimo Kwanza initiative Agriculture First which would prioritise the transformation and growth of the countrys agricultural sector. And in 2010, the then Tanzanian president Jakaya Kikwete went to the World Economic Forum to pitch his country for investment, positing a new model for sustainable agricultural development based on the Kilombero outgrower model; clusters of agribusiness which incorporated small-scale farmers. Sagcot the Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor of Tanzania was born and the investors loved it. USAid promised $2m on the spot.

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An aerial view at the base of the Udzungwa mountains, where the farmland runs up against the forest. Photograph: Sophie Tremblay/For The Guardian

Aid money and international funds came rolling in. A bewildering network of initiatives and partnerships between business and the international sector (Feed the future, the New Alliance, the New Vision for Agriculture Initiative, the Grow Africa Partnership) was either setting up or already in place and focusing on Africa, and Tanzania and Kilombero were perfect candidates. British and Norwegian aid money went to the rice plantation. World Bank money went to the teak plantation. USAid came in to rehabilitate roads, build bridges and generally slosh cash around. Thanks to the west, thanks to aid, it was boomtime in the valley.

The population, meanwhile, grew rapidly. All you needed to do to set up a farm, after all, was to get permission from the local village and pay them a small fee, and then clear an area and get cracking. Nearby were readymade markets for your produce. The valley was beautiful, the land welcoming and fertile. It is hardly surprising that between 1964 and 2015 the valleys population rose from 56,000 to more than half a million.

What about the wildlife?

Baboons
Baboons still live in the valley. One farm at least employs a boy with a catapult to keep them out of the crops. Photograph: Sophie Tremblay/For The Guardian

We tried to get people interested, says Shallom. For years we shouted and screamed and did everything we could to get someone to pay attention. We suggested that the valley should be aggregated into the Selous reserve. We talked to the newspapers, to local government officials, to everyone we could get hold of. But no one was interested.

The valley was being radically transformed. The miombo forest, the open plains, were disappearing as the small farms and the big farms encroached. Every day more of the valley floor was covered with miles of sugar and rice plantation, or with the monocultural teak forests.

The difference is startling. Miombo forest is a mixture of high trees, evergreens, shrubs, flowers, creepers and undergrowth. You can actually hear the density of life here; the low throb of bees, a whine of other insects, the calls of the doves and the shrikes.

Teak is entirely different. The trees are slender, elegant, reaching up to 150ft when mature. The leaves are huge, simple, obtuse in shape with undivided blades; they are thick and slightly sandpapery to the touch. When they fall on the ground, Hinde says, they kill undergrowth. You cant grow anything beneath teak trees. The empty ground beneath the trees, which grow in neat and unnerving lines, means that in this forest it is nearly silent. We spot a solitary buffalo spider, and a few butterflies.

Teak
An aerial view of the teak plantation in the valley. Photograph: Sophie Tremblay/For The Guardian

I talked to the teak company about building wildlife corridors, says Hinde, who monitored the impacts for the conservation NGO Frontier. Hed come to the valley as a young scientist, but had given up in frustration by the time he spoke to the Guardian, and started his own safari company, Wild Things, hoping to instead spur action by bringing people to see the incredible wildlife. They did make a number of changes to make the plantations more wildlife friendly. Measures included setting aside large areas for conservation and breaking up the teak zones in order to help out wildlife. But the corridors they built were too narrow. Villagers would put pitfall traps in them and the elephants would go in feet-first and be trapped for their meat and for their ivory.

Pressure on the wildlife was also coming from the rising population. There has been a massive increase in smallholder farming (predominantly rice) and nomadic cattle herding, says KVTC head Hans Lemm. Pastoralists have entered the valley in significant numbers since the early 2000s.

The old tribes would eat fish, according to Father Klimakus Chahali, who grew up in the valley, and now runs the mission in the town of Itete. They didnt cut down trees. Rumours abounded that some of the new arrivals in the valley had a less friendly attitude to wildlife, and were killing the lions in the valley to protect their livestock. One year, says Shallom, I found 22 lion carcasses. They were poisoning them with pesticides. Bushmeat consumption and poaching rose too: We knew there were cartels operating in the valley but again no one wanted to know.

Other conservationists tried to sound the alarm along with Hinde and Shallom. Trevor Jones of the Southern Tanzania Elephant Program (Step) was one of the most effective; his 2007 map of the wildlife corridors in the valley along with his warnings that they would shortly be shut made it into a number of environmental assessments, including USAIDs. It has been very sad to see all the overgrazing and conversion to farmland of wildlife habitat in the Kilombero valley over the last decade, says Jones.

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A giant footprint up in the north of the valley shows a last remaining spot where elephants still sometimes come out of the forest to nibble at the edges of the sugar plantation. Photograph: Sophie Tremblay/For The Guardian

Anna Estes, a conservationist working in the north of the country, says: The main threat to elephants overall is not big agriculture, but unofficial development from subsistence farmers. 80% of farming in Tanzania is small-scale subsistence farming. Because it is unplanned, this causes a lot of damage to elephant habitat. Aside from the immediate threat from poaching, habitat loss is the number one threat to elephants these days, and human-elephant conflict is an extension of that. The outgrower programme if inadvertently magnified that effect tenfold.

Today farms completely line the road that lies along the west of the valley. A brand new road is planned that will lead from Ifakara, in the centre, along down the east side beside the Selous. Everywhere you look, there are blackened stumps and cleared land, marking the new arrivals creating new farms. Forests that were here a year ago have disappeared. New farms have sprung up in their place.

In a cafe in one village they tell us that most people here have arrived in the last few years; the man in charge only moved here two years ago. Has he ever seen or heard of elephants in the area? He shakes his head. No.

****

So how did government and aid money end up being used to help fund the destruction of a wildlife haven?

I work more and more with the World Bank or the African Development Bank, says scientist Holly Dublin, and I see what their plans and what they are giving loans for to these governments. It is like theres a total disconnect. So what you are going to see is that of course, elephants come last. In fact, anything to do with wildlife comes last.

It wasnt that the big donors were unaware of the risks. The World Bank did 320 pages of assessment on Sagcot [pdf] with a specific case study on Kilombero. They highlighted the high risk from accelerated agribusiness investment noting possible increasing pressure on the forests and their biodiversity. There was some discontent at the World Bank around the project, says Doug Hertzler of ActionAid, who has closely followed the impacts of the Tanzanian agricultural plans. For a long time the funding was held up because of the concerns. They hesitated and dragged their feet but in the end the money went through.

Kilombero
7 North Ruipa IMG 2807 Lions, elephants and hippos have all vanished from Kilombero valley, Tanzania, after UK and US funded projects helped turn a once-thriving habitat into vast tracts of farmland, teak, and sugar plantations Photograph: Sophie Tremblay/For The Guardian

It was a similar story with the US aid agency, USAID, who noted in their own extensive report that Kilombero Valley Floodplain is of global, national, regional and local importance in terms of its ecology and biodiversity and added that the most important direct threat to biodiversity comes in the form of the conversion, loss, degradation, and fragmentation of natural ecosystems. But they went in nonetheless, and their work can be seen all over the valley including the rehabilitation of a road that runs straight through the heart of the Ruipa wildlife corridor and which will, undoubtedly bring more traffic.

A USAID spokesperson at the U.S. Embassy in Tanzania said they were working to help Tanzania improve its environmental performance. Asked if economic development was incompatible with that, he said: It is a problem and were very conscious of it … When were looking at doing a project were looking for that balance between environmental issues and sustainable living. Its a juggling act and were always looking for new ideas.

UK money went in too, in the form of a grant to the rice plantation and support for SAGCOT (they had also been key funders of the teak plantation). They told the Guardian: DFIDs support to developing agriculture in Tanzania is vital for maintaining a stable supply of food, creating jobs and improving prosperity for hundreds of thousands of households. All our agriculture programmes are environmentally sustainable, and protect wildlife and biodiversity, while helping the poorest people lift themselves and their families out of poverty for good. But they also point out, very reasonably, that trade and job creation are the means through which developing countries will become self-sufficient, eliminate poverty and hunger, and end their dependency on aid to help Tanzania stand on its own two feet.

I dont know that development banks can be blamed for not taking into account wildlife, says Dublin. They take into account the health needs, the food needs, the water needs So the fact that they have done their land use planning and the government and the guys who have responsibility for wildlife have not stepped up to the plate in that, I think you have to be careful how you tell that story. When a development agency gives a loan to expand a food project, that is what they are supposed to be doing. That is their job.

The companies in the valley all worry about this too and have all employed their own techniques to try to stem the losses. The rice plantation has run education courses on modern agricultural techniques in order to help local people grow more rice in a smaller area; the teak plantation, in some places, has alternated teak and miombo to try to give the wildlife some space. The sugar plantation is trying to build up a forest area in one part of in the north of the valley where elephants are still sometimes seen, so that the elephants will continue to pass that way without stumbling into the plantations (a beehive fence to keep them in the forest has been strung along one point). But they agree that the problem is just getting worse. As KVTC head Lemm says: We have seen a significant reduction in wildlife. In particular large mammals and the various wildlife corridors that we are part of are under severe pressure.

The Tanzanian government has other priorities. Growth is, of course, prioritised over biodiversity. Julius Nyerere once said I personally am not very interested in animals. I do not want to spend holidays watching crocodiles. Nevertheless, I am entirely in favour of their survival. I talk to heads of state about this all the time, says Kaddu Sebunya, head of the African Wildlife Foundation. One president said to me. Ive never had a voter ask me for more elephants or more natural parks. They want hospitals, education, and thats what keeps him awake at night.

Smallholder
Smallholder farmers and pastoralists have moved in huge numbers to the valley, cutting down forest as they go. Photograph: Sophie Tremblay/For The Guardian

Scientists are warning that a mass species extinction is already underway. Agriculture is one of the most serious threats to the planets biodiversity, and the demand for food and agricultural land is only going to grow. In Kilombero Valley the World Bank predicts that the demand for agricultural land will almost double in the coming 20 years, with a large increase for rice and maize and a smaller increase for sugarcane. Globally, the Food and Agriculture Organisation estimates that an extra 1.2m hevtares of land will be needed for agriculture by 2050. Much of the suitable land not yet in use is concentrated in a few countries in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa, says the FAO report. It makes no reference to biodiversity, but does mention that part of the land is forested, protected or subject to expanding urban settlements.

We have to be pragmatic, and agree to lose something, says Kaddu. The Africa Wildlife Foundation tries to explain to governments and businesses that they need an ecosystem that functions. If you want to continue getting water for agriculture, you need to maintain a landscape that produces rain. But the truth is that we cant have it all. Africa is going to lose wildlife. We are going to have to negotiate. We are going to have to lose a few elephants. Conservationists in Tanzania are working on dozens of initiatives to improve, or at least slow the decline in the biodiversity of Kilombero valley.

Shallom is less sanguine. After years of battling with the state, he shut down his hunting lodge and left the valley. For a while he just gave it all up and let his business fall away; he admits that for the last few years he has struggled. Now he has two new concessions in the Selous; for the first time in the conversation his face lights up as he talks about building up the wildlife there again. But the happiness disappears when we go back to the subject of the valley. Ive seen Kilombero from its best to its worst, he says. To me it is a closed chapter, a very bitter pill I had to swallow. Kilombero is done now. Its over.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/aug/13/tanzanias-ghost-safari-how-western-aid-contributed-to-the-decline-of-a-wildlife-haven

Charlottesville: far-right crowd with torches encircles counter-protest group

People collecting to oppose Unite the Right presentation state they were struck with pepper spray and lighter fluid in clash on University of Virginia school

Hundreds of reactionary demonstrators wielded torches as they progressed to the University of Virginia school in Charlottesville on Friday night and apparently assaulted a much smaller sized group of counter-protesters who had actually connected arms around a statue of Thomas Jefferson.

Starting at a community park less than a mile away, alt-right protesters who have actually collected for the weekend Unite the Right rally marched in a long column over the brief range to the school, shouting mottos like You will not change us and Blood and soil. When the marchers reached and surrounded the counter-protesters there was a brief spoken conflict, #peeee

. Counter-protesters stated they were then assaulted with swung torches, pepper spray and lighter fluid.

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Emily Gorcenski was amongst the protesters who stated they were struck with the mace spray. [They] totally surrounded us and wouldnt let us out.

She stated authorities did not step in till long after the rightwing marchers had actually set out at protesters. I saw numerous individuals shouting Nazi mottos and authorities not do anything.

Goresnki shared a number of live videos of the occasion.

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Charlottesville cops did not react instantly to ask for remark.

Two male protesters who stated they were likewise maced, and did not want to be called, explained reactionary protesters moving from spoken abuse, to pressing and pushing protesters, to the poisonous spray.

Someone from the alt right maced me ideal in the face unprovoked, stated one. After they maced individuals they began punching individuals and striking them with torches. A number of protesters stated a lady utilizing a wheelchair was amongst those sprayed.

<img class="gu-image"itemprop="contentUrl"alt="A"guy is assisted after being struck in
the confront with pepper spray.” src =”https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/0cc96343301f33a32c3a98efc46d36f243793883/0_187_3000_1800/master/3000.jpg?w=300&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=fc0cf044f9432482402bc7abd10e8786″/&gt; A male is assisted after being struck in the confront with pepper spray. Picture: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Just up the street from the fracas, a neighborhood prayer conference was kept in St Pauls memorial church, dealt with by a number of preachers consisting of popular civil liberties leader Dr Cornel West. Completion of the service overlapped with the torch parade and many individuals waited on extended periods prior to leaving mentioning security issues.

In an interview, West stated: The crypto-fascists, the neofascists, the neo-Nazis now feel so empowered, not simply by Trump however by the entire shift in the country to scapegoats.

I do not like this speak about alt-right, thats an unneeded abstraction. These are neofascists in modern clothes.

On Saturday the little college city will deal with down a complete scale Unite the Right rally, which is anticipated to be the nations biggest in a years.

Far-right tracking groups approximate that in between 500 and 1,000 individuals and 30 popular speakers and groups will come down on the downtown location for the Saturday afternoon occasion, arranged by regional rightwing activist and previous Daily Caller author Jason Kessler.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/12/charlottesville-far-right-crowd-with-torches-encircles-counter-protest-group

Forget the environment: we need new words to convey lifes wonders | George Monbiot

We require much better methods of speaking about nature and our relationships with it, composes Guardian writer George Monbiot

I f Moses had assured the Israelites a land streaming with mammary secretions and insect vomit, would they have followed him into Canaan? This indicates milk and honey, I question it would have influenced them.

So why do we utilize such language to explain the natural marvels of the world? There are examples all over, however I will highlight the issue with a couple of from the UK. On land, locations where nature is safeguarded are called websites of unique clinical interest . At sea, they are identified no-take zones or recommendation locations . Had you set out to separate individuals from the living world, you might hardly have actually done much better. When we utilize that word about an individual, #peeee

Even the term reserve is cold and pushing away think of exactly what we imply. The environment is simply as bad: an empty word that produces no images in the mind. Wild plants and animals are referred to as resources or stocks, as if they come from us and their function is to serve us: a concept disastrously extended by the term environment services .

Our attacks on life and charm are likewise sanitised and camouflaged by the words we utilize. When a types is eliminated by individuals, we utilize the term termination. It communicates no sense of our function in the extermination, and blends this elimination with the natural turnover of types. Its like calling murder expiration. Environment modification likewise puzzles natural variation with the devastating interruption we trigger: a confusion intentionally made use of by those who reject our function. (Even this neutral term has actually now been prohibited from usage in the United States Department of Agriculture .) I still see ecologists describing enhanced pasture, suggesting land from which all life has actually been eliminated aside from a number of plant types favoured for grazing or silage. We require a brand-new vocabulary.

Words have an exceptional power to form our understandings . The organisation Common Cause goes over a research study task where individuals were asked to play a video game. One group was informed it was called the Wall Street Game, while another was asked to play the Community Game. It was the very same video game. When it was called the Wall Street Game, the individuals were regularly more self-centered and more most likely to betray the other gamers. There were comparable distinctions in between individuals carrying out a customer response research study and a resident response research study: the concerns were the exact same, however when individuals saw themselves as customers, they were most likely to associate materialistic worths with favorable feelings. When we hear them, #peeee

Words encode worths that are unconsciously set off. When particular expressions are duplicated, they can shape and enhance a worldview , making it difficult for us to see a concern in a different way. Marketers and spin medical professionals comprehend this too well: they understand that they can activate specific actions by utilizing particular language. Numerous of those who look for to safeguard the living world appear invulnerable to this intelligence.

The devastating failure by ecologists to pay attention to exactly what social psychologists and cognitive linguists have actually been informing them has actually caused the worst framing of all: natural capital . This term notifies us that nature is secondary to the human economy, and loses its worth when it can not be determined by loan. It leads nearly inexorably to the claim made by the federal government firm Natural England : The crucial function of an effectively operating natural surroundings is providing financial success.

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off jarvis island”src=”https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/b841bf8bf9671a0787e05a1ef5ef554d0382bbe3/0_14_1631_979/master/1631.jpg?w=300&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=f754ef7a16b659d24af566f7a1e751de”/&gt; Coral off Jarvis Island, in the main Pacific, which has actually been provided wildlife sanctuary status by the United States. Picture: Jim Maragos/AP

By framing the living world in this method, we bury the problems that loan can not determine. In England and Wales, inning accordance with a parliamentary report, the loss of soil expenses around 1bn each year . We take in the implicit idea that this loss might be redeemed by loan when we checked out such declarations. The aggregate of 1bn lost this year, 1bn lost next year and so on is not a specific number of billions. It is completion of civilisation.

On Sunday night, I visited the beavers that have actually started to repopulate the river Otter in Devon . I signed up with individuals silently processing up the bank to their lodge. The buddy I strolled with commented: Its like a trip, right? We discovered a crowd standing in overall silence under the trees when we showed up at the beaver lodge. When initially a kingfisher appeared, then a beaver, you might check out the magic and enjoy every face. Our wonder of nature, and the silence we need to observe when we view wild animals, tips, I think, at the origins of faith.

So why do those who look for to safeguard the living world and who were doubtless motivated to dedicate their lives to it through the very same sense of marvel and respect so woefully cannot record these worths in the method they call the world?

Those who call it own it. The researchers who created the term websites of unique clinical interest were doubtless unknowingly staking a claim: this location is very important due to the fact that it is of interest to us. Those who explain the small pieces of seabed where no business fishing is permitted as recommendation locations are informing us that the significance and function of such locations is as a clinical standard. Yes, they play that function. To the majority of individuals who dive there, they represent much more: incredible havens, thronged with animals that excitement and astonish.

Rather than arrogating calling rights to themselves, expert ecologists need to hire poets and cognitive linguists and amateur nature enthusiasts to assist them discover the words for exactly what they value . Here are a couple of concepts. I hope, in the remarks that follow this short article online, you can include and enhance to them.

If we called safeguarded locations of natural marvel, we would not just speak with individuals love of nature, however likewise develop a goal that communicates exactly what they should be. Lets stop utilizing the word environment, and utilize terms such as living world and natural world rather, as they enable us to form a photo of exactly what we are explaining. Lets desert the term environment modification and begin stating environment breakdown. Rather of termination, lets embrace the word promoted by the legal representative Polly Higgins: ecocide .

We are blessed with a wealth of nature and a wealth of language. Let us bring them together and utilize one to safeguard the other.

George Monbiot is a Guardian writer

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/aug/09/forget-the-environment-new-words-lifes-wonders-language

Unlearning the myth of American innocence

The long read: When she was 30, Suzy Hansen left the US for Istanbul and began to realise that Americans will never understand their own country until they see it as the rest of the world does

My mother recently found piles of my notebooks from when I was a small child that were filled with plans for my future. I was very ambitious. I wrote out what I would do at every age: when I would get married and when I would have kids and when I would open a dance studio.

When I left my small hometown for college, this sort of planning stopped. The experience of going to a radically new place, as college was to me, upended my sense of the world and its possibilities. The same thing happened when I moved to New York after college, and a few years later when I moved to Istanbul. All change is dramatic for provincial people. But the last move was the hardest. In Turkey, the upheaval was far more unsettling: after a while, I began to feel that the entire foundation of my consciousness was a lie.

For all their patriotism, Americans rarely think about how their national identities relate to their personal ones. This indifference is particular to the psychology of white Americans and has a history unique to the US. In recent years, however, this national identity has become more difficult to ignore. Americans can no longer travel in foreign countries without noticing the strange weight we carry with us. In these years after the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the many wars that followed, it has become more difficult to gallivant across the world absorbing its wisdom and resources for ones own personal use. Americans abroad now do not have the same swagger, the easy, enormous smiles. You no longer want to speak so loud. There is always the vague risk of breaking something.

Some years after I moved to Istanbul, I bought a notebook, and unlike that confident child, I wrote down not plans but a question: who do we become if we dont become Americans? If we discover that our identity as we understood it had been a myth? I asked it because my years as an American abroad in the 21st century were not a joyous romp of self-discovery and romance. Mine were more of a shattering and a shame, and even now, I still dont know myself.


I grew up in Wall, a town located by the Jersey Shore, two hours drive from New York. Much of it was a landscape of concrete and parking lots, plastic signs and Dunkin Donuts. There was no centre, no Main Street, as there was in most of the pleasant beach towns nearby, no tiny old movie theatre or architecture suggesting some sort of history or memory.

Most of my friends parents were teachers, nurses, cops or electricians, except for the rare father who worked in the City, and a handful of Italian families who did less legal things. My parents were descendants of working-class Danish, Italian and Irish immigrants who had little memory of their European origins, and my extended family ran an inexpensive public golf course, where I worked as a hot-dog girl in the summers. The politics I heard about as a kid had to do with taxes and immigrants, and not much else. Bill Clinton was not popular in my house. (In 2016, most of Wall voted Trump.)

We were all patriotic, but I cant even conceive of what else we could have been, because our entire experience was domestic, interior, American. We went to church on Sundays, until church time was usurped by soccer games. I dont remember a strong sense of civic engagement. Instead I had the feeling that people could take things from you if you didnt stay vigilant. Our goals remained local: homecoming queen, state champs, a scholarship to Trenton State, barbecues in the backyard. The lone Asian kid in our class studied hard and went to Berkeley; the Indian went to Yale. Black people never came to Wall. The world was white, Christian; the world was us.

We did not study world maps, because international geography, as a subject, had been phased out of many state curriculums long before. There was no sense of the US being one country on a planet of many countries. Even the Soviet Union seemed something more like the Death Star flying overhead, ready to laser us to smithereens than a country with people in it.

Boardwalk
Boardwalk empire a variety shop in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Photo: Michael S Williamson/The Washington Post

I have TV memories of world events. Even in my mind, they appear on a screen: Oliver North testifying in the Iran-Contra hearings; the scarred, evil-seeming face of Panamas dictator Manuel Noriega; the movie-like footage, all flashes of light, of the bombing of Baghdad during the first Gulf war. Mostly what I remember of that war in Iraq was singing God Bless the USA on the school bus I was 13 wearing little yellow ribbons and becoming teary-eyed as I remembered the video of the song I had seen on MTV.

And Im proud to be an American

Where at least I know Im free

That at least is funny. We were free at the very least we were that. Everyone else was a chump, because they didnt even have that obvious thing. Whatever it meant, it was the thing that we had, and no one else did. It was our God-given gift, our superpower.

By the time I got to high school, I knew that communism had gone away, but never learned what communism had actually been (bad was enough). Religion, politics, race they washed over me like troubled things that obviously meant something to someone somewhere, but that had no relationship to me, to Wall, to America. I certainly had no idea that most people in the world felt those connections deeply. History Americas history, the worlds history would slip in and out of my consciousness with no resonance whatsoever.

Racism, antisemitism and prejudice, however those things, on some unconscious level, I must have known. They were expressed in the fear of Asbury Park, which was black; in the resentment of the towns of Marlboro and Deal, which were known as Jewish; in the way Hispanics seemed exotic. Much of the Jersey Shore was segregated as if it were still the 1950s, and so prejudice was expressed through fear of anything outside Wall, anything outside the tiny white world in which we lived. If there was something that saved us from being outwardly racist, it was that in small towns such as Wall, especially for girls, it was important to be nice, or good this pressure tempered tendencies toward overt cruelty when we were young.

I was lucky that I had a mother who nourished my early-onset book addiction, an older brother with mysteriously acquired progressive politics, and a father who spent his evenings studying obscure golf antiques, lost in the pleasures of the past. In these days of the 1%, I am nostalgic for Walls middle-class modesty and its sea-salt Jersey Shore air. But as a teenager, I knew that the only thing that could rescue me from the Wall of fear was a good college.


I ended up at the University of Pennsylvania. The lack of interest in the wider world that I had known in Wall found another expression there, although at Penn the children were wealthy, highly educated and apolitical. During orientation, the business school students were told that they were the smartest people in the country, or so I had heard. (Donald Trump Jr was there then, too.) In the late 1990s, everyone at Penn wanted to be an investment banker, and many would go on to help bring down the world economy a decade later. But they were more educated than I was; in American literature class, they had even heard of William Faulkner.

TV
TV memories Lt Col Oliver North is sworn in before Congress for the Iran-Contra hearings, July 1987. Photograph: Lana Harris/AP

When my best friend from Wall revealed one night that she hadnt heard of John McEnroe or Jerry Garcia, some boys on the dormitory hall called us ignorant, and white trash, and chastised us for not reading magazines. We were hurt, and surprised; white trash was something we said about other people at the Jersey Shore. My boyfriend from Wall accused me of going to Penn solely to find a boyfriend who drove a Ferrari, and the boys at Penn made fun of the Camaros we drove in high school. Class in America was not something we understood in any structural or intellectual way; class was a constellation of a million little materialistic cultural signifiers, and the insult, loss or acquisition of any of them could transform ones future entirely.

In the end, I chose to pursue the new life Penn offered me. The kids I met had parents who were doctors or academics; many of them had already even been to Europe! Penn, for all its superficiality, felt one step closer to a larger world.

Still, I cannot remember any of us being conscious of foreign events during my four years of college. There were wars in Eritrea, Nepal, Afghanistan, Kosovo, East Timor, Kashmir. US embassies in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam were bombed. Panama, Nicaragua (I couldnt keep Latin American countries straight), Osama bin Laden, Clinton bombing Iraq nope.

I knew Saddam Hussein, which had the same evil resonance as communism. I remember the movie Wag the Dog, a satire in which American politicians start a fake war with foreign terrorists to distract the electorate during a domestic scandal which at the time was what many accused Clinton of doing when he ordered a missile strike on Afghanistan during the Monica Lewinsky affair. I never thought about Afghanistan. What country was in Wag the Dog? Albania. There was a typical American callousness in our reaction to the country they chose for the movie, an indifference that said, Some bumblefuck country, it doesnt matter which one they choose.

I was a child of the 90s, the decade when, according to Americas foremost intellectuals, history had ended, the US was triumphant, the cold war won by a landslide. The historian David Schmitz has written that, by that time, the idea that America won because of its values and steadfast adherence to the promotion of liberalism and democracy was dominating op-ed pages, popular magazines and the bestseller lists. These ideas were the ambient noise, the elevator music of my most formative years.

But for me there was also an intervention a chance experience in the basement of Penns library. I came across a line in a book in which a historian argued that, long ago, during the slavery era, black people and white people had defined their identities in opposition to each other. The revelation to me was not that black people had conceived of their identities in response to ours, but that our white identities had been composed in conscious objection to theirs. Id had no idea that we had ever had to define our identities at all, because to me, white Americans were born fully formed, completely detached from any sort of complicated past. Even now, I can remember that shiver of recognition that only comes when you learn something that expands, just a tiny bit, your sense of reality. What made me angry was that this revelation was something about who I was. How much more did I not know about myself?

It was because of this text that I picked up the books of James Baldwin, who gave me the sense of meeting someone who knew me better, and with a far more sophisticated critical arsenal than I had myself. There was this line:

But I have always been struck, in America, by an emotional poverty so bottomless, and a terror of human life, of human touch, so deep, that virtually no American appears able to achieve any viable, organic connection between his public stance and his private life.

And this one:

All of the western nations have been caught in a lie, the lie of their pretended humanism; this means that their history has no moral justification, and that the west has no moral authority.

And this one:

White Americans are probably the sickest and certainly the most dangerous people, of any colour, to be found in the world today.

I know why this came as a shock to me then, at the age of 22, and it wasnt necessarily because he said I was sick, though that was part of it. It was because he kept calling me that thing: white American. In my reaction I justified his accusation. I knew I was white, and I knew I was American, but it was not what I understood to be my identity. For me, self-definition was about gender, personality, religion, education, dreams. I only thought about finding myself, becoming myself, discovering myself and this, I hadnt known, was the most white American thing of all.

I still did not think about my place in the larger world, or that perhaps an entire history the history of white Americans had something to do with who I was. My lack of consciousness allowed me to believe I was innocent, or that white American was not an identity like Muslim or Turk.

White
White Americans are probably the most dangerous people in the world today author James Baldwin in New York, 1963. Photograph: Dave Pickoff/AP

Of this indifference, Baldwin wrote: White children, in the main, and whether they are rich or poor, grow up with a grasp of reality so feeble that they can very accurately be described as deluded.

Young white Americans of course go through pain, insecurity and heartache. But it is very, very rare that young white Americans come across someone who tells them in harsh, unforgiving terms that they might be merely the easy winners of an ugly game, and indeed that because of their ignorance and misused power, they might be the losers within a greater moral universe.


In 2007, after I had worked for six years as a journalist in New York, I won a writing fellowship that would send me to Turkey for two years. I had applied for it on a whim. No part of me expected to win the thing. Even as my friends wished me congratulations, I detected a look of concern on their faces, as if I was crazy to leave all this, as if 29 was a little too late to be finding myself. I had never even been to Turkey before.

In the weeks before my departure, I spent hours explaining Turkeys international relevance to my bored loved ones, no doubt deploying the cliche that Istanbul was the bridge between east and west. I told everyone that I chose Turkey because I wanted to learn about the Islamic world. The secret reason I wanted to go was that Baldwin had lived in Istanbul in the 1960s, on and off, for almost a decade. I had seen a documentary about Baldwin that said he felt more comfortable as a black, gay man in Istanbul than in Paris or New York.

When I heard that, it made so little sense to me, sitting in my Brooklyn apartment, that a space opened in the universe. I couldnt believe that New York could be more illiberal than a place such as Turkey, because I couldnt conceive of how prejudiced New York and Paris had been in that era; and because I thought that as you went east, life degraded into the past, the opposite of progress. The idea of Baldwin in Turkey somehow placed Americas race problem, and America itself, in a mysterious and tantalising international context. I took a chance that Istanbul might be the place where the secret workings of history would be revealed.

In Turkey and elsewhere, in fact, I would feel an almost physical sensation of intellectual and emotional discomfort, while trying to grasp a reality of which I had no historical or cultural understanding. I would go, as a journalist, to write a story about Turkey or Greece or Egypt or Afghanistan, and inevitably someone would tell me some part of our shared history theirs with America of which I knew nothing. If I didnt know this history, then what kind of story did I plan to tell?

City
City watch US army troops stand guard at a checkpoint in Baghdad, Iraq, in August 2007. Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

My learning process abroad was threefold: I was learning about foreign countries; I was learning about Americas role in the world; and I was also slowly understanding my own psychology, temperament and prejudices. No matter how well I knew the predatory aspects of capitalism, I still perceived Turkeys and Greeces economic advances as progress, a kind of maturation. No matter how deeply I understood the USs manipulation of Egypt for its own foreign-policy aims, I had never considered and could not grasp how American policies really affected the lives of individual Egyptians, beyond engendering resentment and anti-Americanism. No matter how much I believed that no American was well-equipped for nation-building, I thought I could see good intentions on the part of the Americans in Afghanistan. I would never have admitted it, or thought to say it, but looking back, I know that deep in my consciousness I thought that America was at the end of some evolutionary spectrum of civilisation, and everyone else was trying to catch up.

American exceptionalism did not only define the US as a special nation among lesser nations; it also demanded that all Americans believe they, too, were somehow superior to others. How could I, as an American, understand a foreign people, when unconsciously I did not extend the most basic faith to other people that I extended to myself? This was a limitation that was beyond racism, beyond prejudice and beyond ignorance. This was a kind of nationalism so insidious that I had not known to call it nationalism; this was a self-delusion so complete that I could not see where it began and ended, could not root it out, could not destroy it.


In my first few months in Istanbul, I lived a formless kind of existence, days dissolving into the nights. I had no office to go to, no job to keep, and I was 30 years old, an age at which people either choose to grow up or remain stuck in the exploratory, idle phase of late-late youth. Starting all over again in a foreign country making friends, learning a new language, trying to find your way through a city meant almost certainly choosing the latter. I spent many nights out until the wee hours such as the evening I drank beer with a young Turkish man named Emre, who had attended college with a friend of mine from the US.

A friend had told me that Emre was one of the most brilliant people he had ever met. As the evening passed, I was gaining a lot from his analysis of Turkish politics, especially when I asked him whether he voted for Erdoans Justice and Development party (AKP), and he spat back, outraged, Did you vote for George W Bush? Until that point I had not realised the two might be equivalent.

Then, three beers in, Emre mentioned that the US had planned the September 11 attacks. I had heard this before. Conspiracy theories were common in Turkey; for example, when the military claimed that the PKK, the Kurdish militant group, had attacked a police station, some Turks believed the military itself had done it; they believed it even in cases where Turkish civilians had died. In other words, the idea was that rightwing forces, such as the military, bombed neutral targets, or even rightwing targets, so they could then blame it on the leftwing groups, such as the PKK. To Turks, bombing ones own country seemed like a real possibility.

Come on, you dont believe that, I said.

Why not? he snapped. I do.

But its a conspiracy theory.

He laughed. Americans always dismiss these things as conspiracy theories. Its the rest of the world who have had to deal with your conspiracies.

I ignored him. I guess I have faith in American journalism, I said. Someone else would have figured this out if it were true.

He smiled. Im sorry, theres no way they didnt have something to do with it. And now this war? he said, referring to the war in Iraq. Its impossible that the United States couldnt stop such a thing, and impossible that the Muslims could pull it off.

Some weeks later, a bomb went off in the Istanbul neighborhood of Gngren. A second bomb exploded out of a garbage bin nearby after 10pm, killing 17 people and injuring 150. No one knew who did it. All that week, Turks debated: was it al-Qaida? The PKK? The DHKP/C, a radical leftist group? Or maybe: the deep state?

The deep state a system of mafia-like paramilitary organisations operating outside of the law, sometimes at the behest of the official military was a whole other story. Turks explained that the deep state had been formed during the cold war as a way of countering communism, and then mutated into a force for destroying all threats to the Turkish state. The power that some Turks attributed to this entity sometimes strained credulity. But the point was that Turks had been living for years with the idea that some secret force controlled the fate of their nation.

In fact, elements of the deep state were rumoured to have had ties to the CIA during the cold war, and though that too smacked of a conspiracy theory, this was the reality that Turkish people lived in. The sheer number of international interventions the US launched in those decades is astonishing, especially those during years when American power was considered comparatively innocent. There were the successful assassinations: Patrice Lumumba, prime minister of the Democratic Republic of Congo, in 1961; General Rafael Trujillo of the Dominican Republic, also in 1961; Ngo Dinh Diem, president of South Vietnam, in 1963. There were the unsuccessful assassinations: Castro, Castro, and Castro. There were the much hoped-for assassinations: Nasser, Nasser, Nasser. And, of course, US-sponsored, -supported or -staged regime changes: Iran, Guatemala, Iraq, Congo, Syria, Dominican Republic, South Vietnam, Indonesia, Brazil, Chile, Bolivia, Uruguay and Argentina. The Americans trained or supported secret police forces everywhere from Cambodia to Colombia, the Philippines to Peru, Iran to Vietnam. Many Turks believed that the US at least encouraged the 1971 and 1980 military coups in Turkey, though I could find little about these events in any conventional histories anywhere.

But what I could see was that the effects of such meddling were comparable to those of September 11 just as huge, life-changing and disruptive to the country and to peoples lives. Perhaps Emre did not believe that September 11 was a straightforward affair of evidence and proof because his experience his reality taught him that very rarely were any of these surreally monumental events easily explainable. I did not think Emres theory about the attacks was plausible. But I began to wonder whether there was much difference between a foreigners paranoia that the Americans planned September 11 and the Americans paranoia that the whole world should pay for September 11 with an endless global war on terror.


The next time a Turktold me she believed the US had bombed itself on September 11 (I heard this with some regularity; this time it was from a young student at Istanbuls Boazii University), I repeated my claim about believing in the integrity of American journalism. She replied, a bit sheepishly, Well, right, we cant trust our journalism. We cant take that for granted.

The words take that for granted gave me pause. Having lived in Turkey for more than a year, witnessing how nationalistic propaganda had inspired peoples views of the world and of themselves, I wondered from where the belief in our objectivity and rigour in journalism came. Why would Americans be objective and everyone else subjective?

I thought that because Turkey had poorly functioning institutions they didnt have a reliable justice system, as compared to an American system I believed to be functional it often felt as if there was no truth. Turks were always sceptical of official histories, and blithely dismissive of the governments line. But was it rather that the Turks, with their beautiful scepticism, were actually just less nationalistic than me?

American exceptionalism had declared my country unique in the world, the one truly free and modern country, and instead of ever considering that that exceptionalism was no different from any other countrys nationalistic propaganda, I had internalised this belief. Wasnt that indeed what successful propaganda was supposed to do? I had not questioned the institution of American journalism outside of the standards it set for itself which, after all, was the only way I would discern its flaws and prejudices; instead, I accepted those standards as the best standards any country could possibly have.

Red
Red state Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoan attends a rally following a failed coup attempt last year. Photograph: Osman Orsal/Reuters

By the end of my first year abroad, I read US newspapers differently. I could see how alienating they were to foreigners, the way articles spoke always from a position of American power, treating foreign countries as if they were Americas misbehaving children. I listened to my compatriots with critical ears: the way our discussion of foreign policy had become infused since September 11 with these officious, official words, bureaucratic corporate military language: collateral damage, imminent threat, freedom, freedom, freedom.

Even so, I was conscious that if I had long ago succumbed to the pathology of American nationalism, I wouldnt know it even if I understood the history of injustice in America, even if I was furious about the invasion of Iraq. I was a white American. I still had this fundamental faith in my country in a way that suddenly, in comparison to the Turks, made me feel immature and naive.

I came to notice that a community of activists and intellectuals in Turkey the liberal ones were indeed questioning what Turkishness meant in new ways. Many of them had been brainwashed in their schools about their own history; about Atatrk, Turkeys first president; about the supposed evil of the Armenians and the Kurds and the Arabs; about the fragility of their borders and the rapaciousness of all outsiders; and about the historic and eternal goodness of the Turkish republic.

It is different in the United States, I once said, not entirely realising what I was saying until the words came out. I had never been called upon to explain this. We are told it is the greatest country on earth. The thing is, we will never reconsider that narrative the way you are doing just now, because to us, that isnt propaganda, that is truth. And to us, that isnt nationalism, its patriotism. And the thing is, we will never question any of it because at the same time, all we are being told is how free-thinking we are, that we are free. So we dont know there is anything wrong in believing our country is the greatest on earth. The whole thing sort of convinces you that a collective consciousness in the world came to that very conclusion.

Wow, a friend once replied. How strange. That is a very quiet kind of fascism, isnt it?

It was a quiet kind of fascism that would mean I would always see Turkey as beneath the country I came from, and also that would mean I believed my uniquely benevolent country to have uniquely benevolent intentions towards the peoples of the world.

During that night of conspiracy theories, Emre had alleged, as foreigners often did, that I was a spy. The information that I was collecting as a journalist, Emre said, was really being used for something else. As an American emissary in the wider world, writing about foreigners, governments, economies partaking in some larger system and scheme of things, I was an agent somehow. Emre lived in the American world as a foreigner, as someone less powerful, as someone for whom one newspaper article could mean war, or one misplaced opinion could mean an intervention by the International Monetary Fund. My attitude, my prejudice, my lack of generosity could be entirely false, inaccurate or damaging, but would be taken for truth by the newspapers and magazines I wrote for, thus shaping perceptions of Turkey for ever.

Years later, an American journalist told me he loved working for a major newspaper because the White House read it, because he could influence policy. Emre had told me how likely it was I would screw this up. He was saying to me: first, spy, do no harm.

Main photograph: Burak Kara/Getty Images for the Guardian

Adapted from Notes on a Foreign Country: An American Abroad in a Post-American World by Suzy Hansen, which will be published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux on 15 August

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Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/aug/08/unlearning-the-myth-of-american-innocence